What are your holiday traditions?

My friend and fellow blogger, Dina, talks about the origin of the tradition of Christmas trees in her newsletter, which got me thinking about the holiday traditions our family looks forward to each year, and how they have changed depending on demographics like the country we are living in and the age of the kids. We spent six Christmas holidays in Japan, and although the Japanese don’t celebrate Christmas, they have come up with some of the most interesting ways to put a Japanese spin on the festivities. The tradition I found the most hilarious is the eating of KFC on Christmas, and the need to place your order months in advance.

In the Jardine family, a tradition is simply something you do more than once, so we have a lot of them. Our oldest holiday pastime is the newspaper barrier my husband creates that blocks the kids from opening presents Christmas morning. When they were young, it made more sense. When two of your kids are 6’3″ and they can see above the few taped pages of newsprint, it doesn’t hold the same significance, however, we still do it every year. For the past five years, we all wear matching Christmas PJs on the 24th while we watch Love Actually and the Polar Express and drink hot chocolate. This year, we are reducing our carbon footprint, and we’ll wear matching fluffy socks. From our years living in Japan, we’ve incorporated the New Year Daruma wish. I buy the tiny ones at  Pearl River Mart. We color in the left eye of the Daruma, and we write our wish for the coming year on the bottom. We place them on a small altar in our apartment (aka book shelf), and then wait for them to come true! They almost never do, but this year we have two wish winners – Annie and Tom (Tom had two of his past year’s wishes come true this year). We will throw those in the fire at New Year’s to acknowledge their accomplishments. The rest sit on the altar waiting for their time to get thrown into the flames.

 

IMG_3659

And each December 23rd, we dress up and eat a massive amount of Chinese food at Mr. Chow, the place I celebrated special occasions with my family as a young girl, made even more special by the fact that Tom asked me to marry him after eating a meal there. We order exactly the same thing every year, never veering from our favorites, and we like it that way.

One of my most practical traditions started about five years ago when I realized that one day my kids are going to want to take their ornaments with them when they get married and have their own trees. So each year they receive an ornament representative of something big or small that happened to them that year. Here are a few examples:

I’m a lover of holiday traditions, so if your family celebrates in a fun or unusual way, please let me know. I’m always looking for new opportunities to have fun, make memories and bring meaning to celebrations.

Wednesday I planned a holiday lunch at Union Square Cafe. It’s the perfect place to celebrate with good friends as the food never disappoints, the service is on point, and the chance of a celebrity sighting is high (I see you Zach Braff and David Schwimmer). It also happens to be across the street from Union Square (natch), and it makes for an easy transition to the holiday market for shopping.

I started the weekend at a two hour breakfast at Buvette another one of my go-to spots. It is one of the original all-day dining restos that are now so popular, opening at 7 am and closing at 2 am. They don’t take reservations, but it’s worth the wait. To me, it’s the cheapest and fastest way to transport myself to Paris. The espresso steamed scrambled eggs with prosciutto and shaved parm is perfection.

IMG_3624

I’ve wanted to have brunch at Sadelle’s since it opened but I refuse to spend a large amount of my weekend standing in line, and it’s not easy to get a reservation during the prime brunch hours. Since it was the first Saturday in months without college football, I planned to seize the day and start very early. We had a table reserved for two at 8:45, and although it wasn’t brunch, it was still oh so awesome.

IMG_3641

IMG_3639

We had enough time after breakfast to walk the semi-empty streets of Soho, window shopping and laughing at all of the ridiculous items for sale. For the person who has literally everything…

IMG_3642

A 10:20 am showing of Mary Queen of Scots at The Angelika Film Center, my favorite place to see a movie since it opened circa 1989, made the start to the day that much more enjoyable. I thought the movie was very entertaining as I am a huge fan of the early royal days and like nothing more than reading or watching anything to do with this historical fiction genre. I am team Saiorse since I first saw her in How I Live Now – the movie version of one of my favorite dystopian Young Adult books (same title).

Today, I spent the morning at the The Whitney Museum.

Thanks to my friend Lotte (who was the idea behind the emptynestnyc.blog btw) we had the good fortune of going “All Andy” with the supreme Whitney docent Debbie. I learned that Debbie has many talents and is the co-founder of an intimate art salon, EdelHaus Art Salon  If you are interested in attending one of her private events, please send me a note and I will connect you. My fascination with Andy began while a student at NYU in the early 80’s when Andy was still alive, and I had the good fortune of spying him at Area – one of my go-to clubs while in college. I was totally obsessed with him and his Factory crew after reading Edie: An American Biography. The show at the Whitney is fabulous, and I will go back as it requires more than the hour I spent this morning.

Tomorrow I am off to Napa to celebrate the holidays with my West Coast Tokyo ladies. The annual gift exchange started in Tokyo and continues each year in California. I cannot wait to arrive. Look for a fun post when I return – maybe even a co-blog post with one of my all-time favorite Tokyo transplanted friends and fellow blogger: Napanista!

Have fun. Be bold.

 

 

 

I’m blaming everything on menopause. It’s just easier that way.

I was the one who thought I’d never go through menopause. Of course, I knew I would one day stop ovulating, but I had a feeling all those ugly symptoms my friends would bemoan about were not going to affect me. Every time a girlfriend would grab paper within her reach and create a makeshift fan, inside I shook my head and said: “that’s never happening to me.” Why I thought this was true, I have no idea. I just did.

Have you heard the saying “when man plans, God laughs?” Here’s a variation on the theme, “When middle-aged women plan, Mother Nature laughs.” And right now she’s bent over holding her sides guffawing. All of a sudden, and I mean all of a sudden, I no longer have a waist or an internal thermometer, my teenage acne has returned, I’m disoriented on occasion, and all I want to do is drink wine. I blame in all on menopause.

But here’s the exciting part; I don’t care. On some level, of course I’m not happy that my pants are tight, or I spend the night kicking off covers, and my doctors cringe when I tell them how much and how often I drink rose, but I’m letting some of the worrying go. And that says a lot because one of the best things I do is worry.

One thing that hasn’t changed is my energy, and Tom and I have been busy! We spent a fabulous 48 hours in Quoque, which if you didn’t know Quogue Is Not The Fucking Hamptons It’s our annual pilgrimage to our friends from Tokyo who now live on the West Coast. One of the highlights was a sea to table meal on the beach. IMG_1361

And seeing this a few feet from land.

IMG_1357

Making the rounds of seaside spots, we spent one night on Hen Island a magical place off the coast of Westchester that no one knows exists. My brother and sister-in-law have a family hideout where you spend most of your time bobbing in the bay, watching the sunset and digging for clams. It’s a complete off the grid opportunity – no running water or electricity – rustic and remote.

IMG_1409 2

We returned home, showered, and had a night in our bed before taking off on the next adventure, item #10 on my Summer To Do List – Glamping on Governor’s Island at Collective Retreats. The forecast improved over the course of the day, and we took the 1pm ferry to the island. Waiting for us in the ferry terminal on the city side was a rep from the company that checked us in and gave us braided bracelets that showed that we were guests of the retreat. Five minutes later, we were on the relatively empty island and were so excited to have Island Oyster mostly to ourselves. We’d been before on a weekend, and it was a madhouse. IMG_1426

We took our time and had a delicious lunch with lots of cold beverages. Walking over to the Collective Retreat area of the island (it’s a long walk, and there is no other way to get there than by walking – bring a wheelie bag), the weather looked like it was about to take a turn for the nasty. IMG_1435

But we were optimistic because it looked like this on the island.

We found our cabin and were so excited to settle in for an afternoon nap and some reading. Within 15 minutes, this happened.

We were evacuated, along with everyone on the island. They refunded our money, and we’re going to try again next summer. On another note, an Italian resort company known for restoring old buildings and making them into cool resorts just bought a huge piece of the island and will be opening in 2020 as a resort spa. I can’t imagine a better view from the pool. It’s on my Summer 2020 To Do List.

I started lifting weights recently – gasp…Tom has been begging me every other day for a year, and I finally said yes. I’ve been eight times, and I don’t hate it. But sometimes it leaves me a little stiff, and the other day I saw a great ad in a cab for a new spot called Strech’d. It’s a place you go where someone stretches you out. I went for the quickie session (25 minutes), and I came out feeling like I could twist and turn and bend much better than when I went in. It’s about half the price of a massage, and you leave without feeling like a greased watermelon. I bought a packet of five, and I’m looking forward to my next visit.

I have a friend that I’ve known for a long time, but we haven’t spent a lot of time together. But whenever we get together, we have a plan and a destination, and it’s always enlightening. This past Wednesday it was a guided tour of the UN. The last time I was at the UN I was in 3rd grade. Our tour guide, a beautiful journalist from Brazil that speaks three languages fluently and was very well versed in all things UN said they never get visitors from NY – everyone is always from somewhere else. The one hour tour costs $20 and is extremely interesting. I highly recommend it! Here I am pretending to be a delegate.

IMG_1506

I’m writing this blog from the Kimpton Hotel in Charlotte, NC. Tom and I are here to celebrate the 50th birthday of a very good friend who is one of the strongest women I know. It’s a priviledge to be here to celebrate another year of Rachel.

IMG_1529

Charlotte is a pretty happening city. Our hotel is a short walk from the Panther’s stadium (we had tickets to see them play the Dolphins last night, but my handbag was too big, so they turned us away), but fortunately, our hotel has a hopping rooftop bar with awesome views.

We’ve been enjoying the Southern Hospitality and the southern sized portions!

Sweet potato pancakes, a pimento cheese omelet and fried green tomatoes with faro, kale, and cauliflower.

Looking forward to the celebration tonight!

Have fun. Be bold.

 

Old School

IMG_9778

Thomas Wolfe said, “You can’t go home again,” but that doesn’t apply to people from Rhode Island. Tom and I went back to Providence this weekend for his 30th reunion from Brown. Tom was not only a student at Brown, but he was a townie too, having grown up in Providence, which added another dimension to our walk down memory lane. What was so striking, was how much has remained the same in the capital of the smallest state in the union. From Antonelli’s poultry shop where Tom plucked feathers from chickens as a part-time job – at the age of 10, to the thick crust Caserta pizza, and the thin crust Al Forno’s, to the incredible Italian specialities on Federal Hill, and Andreas’ Greek restaurant on Thayer Street, nothing had changed.

Brown reunions are celebrated along with graduation, turning the entire city of Providence (which isn’t that large to begin with) Brown. They throw an incredible party, called Campus Dance, turning the green into a ballroom, a tradition started in the 1860’s! The event draws crowds up to 15,000 with attire ranging from shorts and t-shirts to tuxedos and top hats. They always have a big jazz band, and the entire green is lit with hundreds of paper lanterns. The last one I attended was in 1993 and one of the highlights was seeing JFK, Jr. and his date, Daryl Hannah.

IMG_9867

Instead of getting a hotel room 30 minutes outside of Providence (every room in town was booked), we decided to opt for an Airbnboat. When I reserved it way back in September, I thought how fun it might be, but when the time came to wheel my suitcase down the dock ramp, I started to question my decision. Tom, of course, was thrilled. I immediately popped three Bonine.

IMG_9781

Turns out, sleeping on a houseboat is fantastic. I haven’t slept better in years. This was my view brushing my teeth. Not a bad way to wake up.

IMG_9936

We even entertained a few old friends for sips and snacks.

84578A26-EB60-4EE6-9A80-1A5705B6BB9D

The weather changed from a blazing 90 degrees to 55 and pouring. We thought about leaving early and heading home, but we sort of got attached to the little houseboat. It was pretty cozy bundled up under the covers watching Lost in Space while the boat gently rocked, and the rain pelted the windows. I was actually a little sad to leave Monday morning.

IMG_9949

Our waiter at brunch said, “Providence is just like Boston, just friendlier and less expensive.” I’m not from Boston, so I can’t compare. But I think Providence is actually like nowhere else. I’m glad I get to call it my home-by-marriage. It’s a pretty special place, and they make some pretty awesome people.

Here’s a link to the houseboat.

Some not to miss spots while in Providence:

Al Forno

Milk Money

RISD Art Museum

For old school pizza that hasn’t changed since 1953 Caserta Pizza

Italian specialty shop like no other (sit and have a coffee with the locals while your sandwich is made): Venda Ravioli

Breakfast at Brickway on Wickenden (we went twice).

Have fun. Be bold.

 

 

 

The City Never Sleeps Better Slip You An Ambien

IMG_8231

I didn’t get a ton of sleep this week, but I can’t blame it on NYC. I often wonder why mother nature thought that when women become a certain age, they no longer need sleep. Why she felt we need to roll around in bed at 2 am worrying about problems that are unsolvable, making to-do lists, or writing novels we can’t remember in the morning escapes me. Now, when I pass by my tightly made bed during the day, I stare it down like it’s an enemy I’ll have to battle later on.

Sleepless nights didn’t find me lounging around on the couch. It was week 9 in the job search, and so far I’ve applied to ten jobs, had two interviews, and have heard nothing since. Last night I had dinner with a millennial, and after explaining my thoughts on age bias in the workforce, her advice was to lop off anything on my resume that had a 1 in front of it, as in 1988.  Week 10 will find my job applications with a newly improved resume – nothing before 2000. I’ll keep you posted on my little bias experiment.

It was a delicious week. I had a fantastic lunch at Mamman which isn’t new to NYC, but new to my neighborhood. I envision many re-writes of my novel taking place at one of their communal farmhouse tables. I am addicted to the stuffed pita at Miznon. I asked the adorable Israeli cashier which pita was her favorite and she said without hesitation it was the folded cheeseburger. She was not wrong. They serve their pitas with the most giant shishito pepper I’ve ever eaten. I’m going back soon for the roast beef, her number two pick.

IMG_8235

I went to a super fun birthday dinner at Macao. The perfect place to celebrate with a big group. Great plates for sharing, an intimate, yet warm and friendly room, and if you’re lucky, a jazzy band that’s just the right amount of entertainment.

I’ve mentioned Play by Play before – it’s my seat filler club. This week I was fortunate to get an orchestra center seat to see The Parisian Woman for $4.50.

Tom and I got a reservation at Pasquale Jones the super hot pizza spot in Nolita, and we loved it. Welcoming space, friendly staff, and a great pie.

Dinner, Saturday night at Houseman, wasn’t boring. We were showered with broken glass on three different occasions. I found this almost statistically impossible, but it happened. We were picking glass out of our laps, clearing it from our table and once we had to get up from our seats so the busboy could wipe them down. I think they need to invest in stronger glassware and should also consider the concept of comping. In the end, they sent us dessert wine that no one wanted. I hate it when restaurants don’t understand hospitality. I wanted to love the place, the food was super yummy and creative, and I walked away thinking, meh. Not to mention, the bartender was cranky. I’m not a fan of cranky bartenders.

When I moved into my neighborhood eight months ago, I noticed a karaoke bar on 17th street. I tucked its existence away for future reference, and the future was last night. I’m terrible at karaoke, but I’m married to someone who kills it, and some of my best Tokyo nights were spent at Fiesta in Roppongi.  Karaoke One7 is the perfect combination of karaoke and bar. They have private rooms in the back, and every once in a while, the front door opens, and a small van pulls up with a group that would snake through the bar to their private cave. But the bar is for those who want to sing among strangers. For $2 a song (or $20 to cut to the front of the line), you can lead the disparate crew to the tune of your choice. It’s fascinating how music and booze can make the fastest of friends.

So excited for the Oscars tonight!

Have fun. Be bold.

 

Paris Unplanned

IMG_20180216_152527

I’m laughing as I type in the title to this post because anyone who knows me knows I would never go to Paris without planning. However, I kept the scheduled activities to a minimum. Tom and I had an entire week to ourselves in Paris, and I wanted it to be as spontaneous as possible. We’d been to Paris before, both on our own, and together, which meant this time around our trip would be less about checking things off and more about going with the flow.

What was great about the trip was sleeping late, without worrying about where we had to be, as any plans I’d made always started with a lunch reservation. Some of the gastronomic highlights included the crepe complete at Breizh Cafe, the onion soup at Le Philosophes the pistachio and chocolate escargot at Du Pain et des Idees  the steak frite at Le Severo the beef bourguignon at Le 6 Paul Bert the absolute beauty of Le Grand Coeur, the carrot veloute at The Clown Bar (the pigeon pictured below, not so much), the poached egg with shaved truffles at Bistrot Belhara and the warm fuzzy feeling we had at Gaspard de la Nuit.

Of course, besides eating, shopping and drinking champagne (there was a lot of the latter), we filled our days with long walks to nowhere, which ended up including Montmartre, Luxembourg Garden, St. Germain des Pres, La Tour Eiffel, The Louis Vuitton Foundation, The Musee Rodin, Saint Chapelle, Le Marais (many times), Canal St. Martin, the Musee D’Orsay, and Conciergerie. We even had drinks at Hotel Costes with our friend Saniya, who was in town for work. I love being an ex-expat, as I find my chances of finding friends wherever I go increases ten-fold.

*One of our best nights ended with the late show of Le Crazy Horse. I loved it, but not as much as Tom. If you haven’t been, I highly recommend it.

About shopping, it felt like the entire city of Paris was on sale. Every store window had a “Soldes” display. If you want to come to Paris to shop, come in January/February. In addition to returning to Tom’s favorite spot to buy his funky shirts, he’s become “famous” for at Coton Doux I discovered City Pharma (aka the French Fountain of Youth). I think I am the last person on earth to learn of its treasures as it was by FAR the most crowded of any establishment Tom and I entered all week! I left with a bag full of goodies.

I truly enjoyed our unintentional week away, but…if I had to do it all again, with a little more organization (sorry, I just can’t help myself), I would create lists by arrondissement of places of interest, so that when we went to the far reaches of Paris for dinner or lunch (which we often did), I would have an idea of what I could see or do while there. In my experience, many of the new hot places to eat are not necessarily located in the most central of locations.

One of the things I like most about traveling is the research I do leading up to a trip. Of course, I ask friends who’ve been many times which is a great resource, but I also love me some boots on the ground. For that, I go to my favorite bloggers. For Paris, I’ll always ask my friend Dina for food advice. This time around, she recommended Le 6 Paul Bert and also was a big help in making a few hard to get reservations. You can follow her at www.worldfooddina.com She’s a fellow Tokyo expat, who lived in Paris before moving to New York a few years ago. She also has excellent tips for eating in NYC and Tokyo. I also love Lindsey Tramuta who blogs at www.lostincheeseland.com and is the author of the new book The New Paris a fantastic source for all things Paris. And lastly, I love reading Sara Leiberman’s newsletter Overthinking It.

Here are some snaps of our winter week in Paris. I’m sure people questioned our decision to go in winter, but Paris is beautiful any time of year, and there is nowhere more romantic to celebrate Valentine’s Day!

Merci beaucoup to D’anna for making the week possible.

Have fun. Be bold.

 

 

 

Points of View

Screen Shot 2018-02-05 at 11.44.47 AM

I have no business hanging out in FiDi. I have no job that takes me there, nor any other reason to take the 6 train to Fulton Street, and yet I find myself returning time and again. It could be the unparalleled view from The Bar Room at Temple Court, or the rosé gummie bears and other assorted alcohol-infused candies they sell at Sugarfina in the Oculus,  or the “feels like Paris” vibe of Augustine it’s an area I suggest adding to any NYC itinerary.

IMG_7820

At the beginning of the week, the weather allowed for a quick walk with a friend on the bridal path in Central Park. We didn’t have much time, so we entered the park at 85th and 5th and walked up to 96th. You get a “big bang for the buck” on the quick trip as the view is breathtaking and you can stop in for a brekkie board and a flat white at Blue Stone Lane on East 90th Street inside the Church of the Heavenly Rest.

I met up with a friend from out of town at Danji for lunch. Danji is one of my “go to” spots for a pre-theater dinner in Midtown, and now they are open for lunch. I can’t say enough about the bibimbap set. It was delicious and economical too. Make a reservation as it was packed!IMG_7829

This week I got a request for a hotel recommendation in the city that wasn’t too expensive for parents and teens to stay together while looking at colleges. I suggested the new Freehand Hotel, but I would also recommend reading this article for more suggestions throughout the city.  Have you heard about the new Recharge app? You can book luxury hotels by the minute. In a recent article about the app, the writer suggested using the app for nursing mothers and people on business trips between meetings. Strangely enough, it didn’t mention the most obvious of uses. It seems these days, there’s an app for everything.

I spent most of the weekend at the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators Conference (SCBWI) at the Grand Hyatt so there was no time for brunch. Instead, I’ll mention my yummy lunch at UrbanSpace. I often find myself dining and dashing at many of their delicious vendors while in Midtown. On Saturday I ate at Mr. Bing; a new addition to the UrbanSpace food market. I chose the Peking Duck Beijing pancake medium spicy. I relished every bite and could have shared it with a friend, the portion was so large. IMG_7837

Saturday night I had a reservation at Tokyo Record Bar. You might have already heard about this place as it’s super-buzzy right now. It’s on MacDougal in the West Village in the basement of a brownstone building (their upstairs neighbor is the bubbly Air’s Champagne Parlor a current favorite of mine.) You need to get a reservation at Tokyo Record Bar, stat. They only have two seatings a night, 6:30 and 10:30 and they offer a tasting menu for $50/pp. I don’t want to give away too much, but let’s just say that after dessert, they bring out a large cheese pizza for gluten fans and french fries for the gluten-free. Go. IMG_7853

Tom and I ended the week at a high-calorie, super fun Superbowl party back in Rye. No matter how many adventures #emptynestnyc is having living in the city, it’s always important to remember where you came from and the people who are important in your life.

Have fun. Be bold.

Hello Monday!

IMG_7765

Friday afternoon, Tom texted and asked, “What are we up to this weekend?” My response: “What are we NOT up to is the question.” I do try to pack as much as possible into non-football watching weekends. After work on Friday, we had a quiet dinner in front of a wood burning fireplace in Tribeca at a place I’ve mentioned in the blog before, Tiny’s. Romantic it was, but the food was just meh, and I don’t love eating ok meals in a city where you don’t have to do that. We finished off the night watching Get Out. I’ve wanted to see this movie for a while, but I’m a bit of a wuss when it comes to scary movies. I got over my fear and was absolutely riveted. I totally get why Daniel Kaluuya was nominated for an Academy Award.

Saturday started early at Soho House for brunch with friends. We aren’t members, but it was lovely to be invited. They have a gorgeous spread in a beautiful room – I highly recommend it if you have the opportunity to go. It was a warmish day in NYC, so we decided to walk the Highline up to Jacob Javits on 34th. The Highline is beautiful no matter what time of year, and they always have new art installations. Walking north from 14th is like fast-forwarding through time. You start in the Meatpacking District where landmark buildings have been faithfully restored, and then you smack right into the dystopian future of Hudson Yards.

IMG_7757IMG_7758IMG_7762

Our destination was the New York Times Travel Show at Jacob Javits. I’m travel obsessed and always in search of the next best thing. Unfortunately, I didn’t find it at the travel show, but I did find these guys from the DR.

IMG_7766

We did a quick walk through the convention and decided it was time to leave, and eat again. The sun was out, and I immediately thought picnic. Back down in our Gramercy neighborhood, I grabbed a sandwich “to go” at Daily Provisions The line was obscene. I try only to go there mid-week when the lines are manageable, but their sandwiches are so good, and I was craving the Milanese. If you go and plan on bringing your sandwich to a picnic (Union Square Park is two blocks away), I would suggest you ask them to cut your sandwich and make sure to bring extra napkins. They are delicious but messy.

I was very excited about our Saturday night plans. I’ve been waiting for the opportunity to go to the Metrograph for some time, but couldn’t find a movie I felt both Tom and I would enjoy. The Metrograph is a very unique place to see old films. You feel like you’ve entered a theater you might find back in the ’20’s in New York City. You can eat dinner before or after a show, upstairs in The Commissary and then have a coffee in the lobby lounge before you go inside. And the candy selections are unparalleled!

The movie I chose was called Savage Grace. I’d never heard of the movie, but it starred Juliane Moore and a very young Eddy Redmayne, so that was good enough for me. After a very nice meal, we arrived to find a full house as it was the 10th anniversary of the film, and the director, producers, and cinematographer were all in attendance for a post film Q&A. I had no idea that was a part of the $15 ticket, so it was an extra special treat. I probably should have read the movie synopsis beforehand, but let’s just say it DEFINITELY wasn’t a boring film. And finding out afterward that it was a true story sort of blew our minds. If you haven’t seen it, I recommend it. I’m thinking of buying the book for a deeper dive.

Sunday was a rainy day, and we could have easily stayed in PJ’s and watched more movies, but I had promised a friend who just opened a new restaurant on the Lower East Side that we would come for brunch and try his food. It’s called Brigitte, and it is a sweet little French restaurant on the fringes of the LES. It’s French, but not fussy and the staff couldn’t have been friendlier. We enjoyed our meal and will return and try dinner next time. No matter how many times I go to the Lower East Side, I can never figure out where I am. Navigation is not a skill I have, yet you’d think after going many times, I’d figure it out. Nope, it kicks my butt every time. For example, the restaurant was literally around the corner from both my son’s apartment and the Metrograph from the night before, and I had no idea until after I arrived. C’est la vie. I look forward to spending more time in that part of the city as it’s a treasure trove of discoveries. I see many spring weekends in my future getting happily lost.

One last note, a highlight of my week was a literal fireside chat with a friend in the lobby bar of The Marlton Hotel. Several hours passed, as did glasses of wine and a large plate of very good french fries, before I realized it was time to go home and make dinner. It’s a fabulous place to spend an afternoon with a friend, or with their free wireless access.

Enjoy your week! Have fun. Be bold.